How to Conduct a GMDSS Inspection (FCC version)

The GMDSS replaces the ship-to-ship safety system that used manual Morse code with a ship-to-shore safety system that uses satellite and automated terrestrial communications systems. The GMDSS requires ships to carry various types of communications equipment depending upon the voyages of the ship rather than the gross tonnage. The GMDSS also requires ships to comply with certain functional requirements. The GMDSS rules are found in subpart W of Part 80 [Code of Federal Regulations, Title 47, Part 80] and are applicable to the appropriate tonnage and operational areas of Passenger and Cargo vessels. Under the Communications Act, Fishing vessels are considered to be Cargo vessels and, all these vessels are the subject to Radio Inspection.

To provide a GMDSS inspection the engineer must obtain an appropriate license for Inspectors.

In the course of survey carrying, the inspector should draw-up a report of Inspection.

Definitions of Sea Areas:

Ships must comply with the requirements for all Sea Areas in which they operate.

  • Sea Area A1 - Basically within VHF Coast Station range
  • Sea Area A2 - Basically within MF Coast Station range
  • Sea Area A3 - Ocean areas within INMARSAT coverage - below 70 degrees N Latitude and above 70 degrees S Latitude. Most ships will operate in Sea Area A3.
  • Sea Area A4 - Out of INMARSAT coverage area -above 70 degrees N Latitude and below 70 degrees S Latitude. These ships must be equipped with a HF DSC and NBDP installation.

Exempted Vessels

Please note that this form is also to be used (in part) for vessels in compliance with Part 80.851 (Subpart R Compulsory Radiotelephone Installations for Vessels 300 Gross Tons) quoted here:

“The radiotelephone requirements of this subpart are applicable to all compulsory ships which are not required to comply with subpart W of this part in total or in part because they have received an exemption from all or some of the subpart W provisions.” The Subpart R vessels are limited in operation to 100 miles from shore – effectively classing them as Sea Area A1 and Sea Area A2 vessels without the requirement for DSC operability.

The applicable inspection points are noted with an ‘X-R’ to indicate their exemption or non applicability

Please note that this form is also to be used for Fishing vessels as noted above. In the case of those Fishing vessels which are only operating in Sea Areas 1 and 2, they are currently under exemption from the carriage of DSC equipment until the U.S. Coast Guard declares that Sea Areas 1 and 2 are operational.

Exempted items are noted with “X-F1/2” – all other Subpart W items are required by these vessels.

Inspection Report

In the course of survey carrying, the inspector should draw-up a report of Inspection.

This report has to reflect ship’s particulars, such as:

-       Vessel name

-       Date of survey

-       Survey location

-       Port of registry

-       Gross Tonnage

-       Cargo or Passenger Vessel

-       Number of passengers

-       Call Sign

-       MMSI Number

-       IMO Number

-       USCG Number

-       Telex ID Number (NBDP)

-       INMARSAT Number(s)

-       Additional ID numbers

-       Sea area(s) in which vessel is certified to operate: A1/ A2/ A3/ A4

-       Is it a vessel falling under Subpart R

-       Is it an exempt fishing vessel

The following test instruments are necessary for survey:

-       Frequency counter


-       Watt meter with plug in elements covering MF, HF, and VHF.

-       Ampere/Volt/Ohm meter.

-       Instrument for decoding the ID-signal of satellite EPIRBs

-       Acid tester (specific gravity)

-       Insulation resistance tester

-       GMDSS Test Set
Spectrum analyzer

-       Oscilloscope

-       Deviation meter

Procedure of the Radio Survey

Firstly the inspector starts with ship sources of energy checking.

The procedure and the requirements are as follows:

a) Reserve power must meet either six (6) hour or one (1) hour requirement.

Six hours for ships constructed before February 1, 1995, or ships that do not meet the emergency power requirements of SOLAS, Chapter II-1, Regulation 42 or 43.

One hour for ships constructed after February 1, 1995, or older ships that voluntarily comply with SOLAS, Chapter II-1, Regulation 42 or 43. (X-R)

b) Verify that a continuous supply of electrical power, within equipment tolerances, is provided to all GMDSS equipment that could be affected by normal variations and interruptions of ship's power.

c) When the reserve source of energy consists of batteries, equipment must be provided for automatically recharging them to minimum required capacity in not more than 10 hours.

d) When the reserve source of energy consists of batteries, the battery capacity must be checked at intervals not exceeding 12 months. If not completed within past 12 months, this must be done during inspection.

e) Storage batteries provided as a reserve source of energy must be installed in accordance with applicable electrical codes and good engineering practice. They must be protected from adverse weather and physical damage. They must be readily accessible for maintenance and replacement.

The following items should be checked and tested as necessary and found satisfactory:

  1.  Check main source of energy available in accordance with requirements. 

  2.  Emergency generator should be fitted and functional as per Master. 

  3.  If reserve source of energy is a battery, specify make and model. 
If reserve source is a generator, specify make and model.

1) Check the integrity of the installation. Specify location.

2) Check for defects including all cables.

3) Verify that there is sufficient capacity to operate the basic and/or duplicated equipment
for six (6) hours or one (1) hour (X-R) as appropriate. Specify 1 (X-R) or 6 hours. 


  1.  Check the reserve battery condition by specific gravity measurement or voltage measurement. Specify voltage or specific gravity. 

  2.  With battery off charge, and the maximum required radio installation load connected to the reserve source of energy, check the battery voltage after testing and the 
discharge current. Specify maximum discharge current and voltage.
  3.  Check that the charger(s) are capable of recharging the reserve battery to the minimum capacity needed within 10 hours 

  4.  Check that battery charger is of an automatic type. 

  5.  The capacity of battery(s) should be checked at intervals not exceeding 12 months. Minimum capacity is calculated as: (1 ⁄ 2 transmitter currents + all receiver currents + emergency light + bridge to bridge VHF + GNSS receiver + all other devices) times the number of hours necessary to power the station (1 or 6 hours).

Then the engineer continue with Radio Installations checking.

  1.  Check for FCC Certification and/or GMDSS compliance labels. 

  2.  Make sure that equipment installed fulfills the functional requirements for the vessel's areas of operation. 

  3.  Permanently installed lighting sufficient to illuminate the operating controls of the radio installation and powered from a source independent of the ship's main and emergency power sources must be provided.
  4.  Radiotelephone Station Clock should be mounted near the operating position (R vessels only)
  5.  Spare assembled antenna for MF/HF equipment must be onboard (R vessels only)
  6.  Radio installation should be clearly marked with call sign, ship station identity, and other applicable codes.
  7.  Must be able to initiate distress alert from position from which the vessel is normally navigated
  8.  Note where the radio equipment is located.
  9.  Remote control should be provided from conning position.
  10.  Was a visual inspection made of all MF/HF, VHF, INMARSAT, GPS antennas and coaxial feeders for satisfactory placement (including consideration of any possible interference)?

Check that the MF/HF transmitting antennas are protected against being touched accidentally. 


VHF installation

a) Required to have DSC channel 70 and must be able to initiate transmission of distress alerts from the position from which the ship is navigated. (X-F1/2 and X-R vessels)

b) Required to have channels for radiotelephony (transmit and receive): 6, 13, 16.

c) Must have a separate, dedicated, non-scanning receiver capable of monitoring DSC on VHF channel 70 (will accept either a separate radio installation or a separate receiver combined with the VHF radio. In either event, the ship must have continuous monitoring capability for DSC on
channel 70.) (X-F1/2 and X-R vessels)

d) The transmitter power output must be between 6 and 25 watts.

e) The equipment must have a frequency tolerance of 10Hz per MHz.

f) Check that VHF installations are FCC Certified for GMDSS (must have a label so stating). (X-F1/2 and X-R vessels)

SART – Search And Rescue Transponder (all vessels)

a) One (1) required for ships of between 300 and 500 gross tons Two (2) required for ships 500 gross tons or greater.

b) FCC Certified for GMDSS (must have a label so stating).

c) Self test capability required.

Checking a SART please point out in report Make / Model and Frequency band and:

  1. Check for satisfactory functional test using on board 9GHz radar, if possible.
  2. Check for satisfactory stowage.
  3. Check for operating instructions.
  4. Check for sufficient battery capacity for stand-by condition and to provide transmissions.

5. Check for clear markings with ship's call sign.

6. Point out in report battery expiration date.

GMDSS VHF-FM Handheld Radios (all vessels)

a) Two (2) required for ships of between 300 and 500 gross tons Three (3) required for ships 500 gross tons or greater.

b) Should be FCC Certified for GMDSS (must have a label so stating).

c) Battery expiration date to be marked on equipment.

d) Must have Channel 16 plus one other (at minimum).

e) Must be an additional battery to be used for testing purposes (cannot be one of the compulsory batteries).

Checking the VHF Handheld:

  1. Point out Make / Model and operating channels.
  2. Check for satisfactory functional test.
  3.             Check for satisfactory stowage/availability.
  4.             Check for operating instructions.
  5. Check that the primary battery seals have not been broken.
  6.         Checked for clear markings with ship's call sign
  7.             Point out battery expiration dates. 


Maritime Safety Information receiver(s) (all vessels)

a) For Navtex, it must be a dedicated receiver.

b) FCC Certified for GMDSS (must have a label so stating).

c) Vessel must be capable of receiving MSI information in all areas in which the ship operates

While Navtex checking

1. Point out Make and Model.

2. Check for correct operation by monitoring incoming messages or inspecting recent hard copy.

3. Performed test run of the self-test program, if provided.

NOTE: This requirement(s) below only apply to ships operated in areas where NAVTEX service is not available (typically A3 and A4 Ocean Areas).

For proper EGC Receiver check (X-R)

1. Point out Make and Model.

2. Checked for correct operation by monitoring incoming messages or inspecting recent hard copy.

3. Performed test run of the self-test program, if provided.

To check HF MSI Receiver (if applicable) (X-F1/2 and X-R)

1. Point out Make and Model.

2. Checked for correct operation by monitoring incoming messages or inspecting recent hard copy.

3. Performed test run of the self-test program, if provided.

Category 1, 406 MHz EPIRB (all vessels)

a) The installation must be such that the EPIRB will not be caught up in any rigging or structure if the ship should capsize. The unit must be capable of automatic release when submerged and automatic activation when placed in water. Additionally, the unit must also be capable of manual release and manual activation.

b) The battery date must not be expired.

c) The EPIRB(s) must be registered with NOAA

d) Should be FCC certified for GMDSS (must have a label so stating).

e) Must have a self test capability.

Follow the instructions for 406 MHZ EPIRB checking

First of all point the EPIRB Make and Model, then:

1. Check position and mounting for float free operation. Verify that EPIRB is installed in an easily accessible position and is ready to be manually released and capable of being carried by one person into a survival craft.

2. Verify that the lanyard is firmly attached, in good condition, neatly stowed, and not tied to the vessel or the mounting bracket.

3. Carry out visual inspection for defects.

4. Carry out the self-test routine.

5. Check that the EPIRB ID and other information (include call sign and MMSI of the ship) is clearly marked on the outside of the equipment.

6. Decode the EPIRB identity number and other information confirming it is correct and the same as that marked on the EPIRB. Note the 15-digit Hexadecimal Number.

7. Check the registration through documentation (sticker) or directly with NOAA.

8. Check battery expiry date(s)

9. Check hydrostatic release(s) expiration date(s).

10. Check the emission in the 406 MHz band using the self-test mode or an appropriate device to avoid transmission of a distress call to satellites. BEACON Tester 406 02 is an appropriate tool for this case.

11. If possible, check emission on the 121.5MHz frequency using the self-test mode or an appropriate device to avoid activating the satellite system. BEACON Tester 406 02 is an appropriate tool for this case.

12. Check that no transmission has been started after the test and remounting of the EPIRB in its bracket.

13. Check for the presence of beacon operating instructions.

Spare Parts are required for all vessels, so check the following:

a) Tools, spares, and test equipment as deemed necessary.

b) Instruction and maintenance manuals, recommended spare parts, tools
and test equipment for all required equipment should be provided.

c) Check that test equipment, manuals and spares carried, are adequate in accordance with the sea areas in which the ship trades and the declared options for maintaining availability of the functional requirements.

Publications and documents required for all vessels.

a) Valid station license and posted.

b) Operator license(s) (X-R vessels).

(1) Two (2) operators (GMDSS Radio Operator) are required; one must be designated as the primary operator in times of distress.

(2) One (1) member of crew with GMDSS Radio Maintainer License if on-board maintenance option is elected.

c) Station log with correct entries

d) Publications (X-R vessels)

FCC Rules & Regulations Part 80

IMO publication: Master Plan of Shore Based Facilities

Alphabetical List of Maritime Mobile Call Signs

List of Ship Stations

Manual for Use by Maritime Mobile Service and Satellite Service

List of Coast Stations

List of Radiodetermination and Special Services Stations

Maintenance requirements (X-R vessels)

a) Ships must select a method of maintenance that depends on the area of operation. Ships operated in Sea Areas A1 or A2 must select at least one of the methods of maintenance. Ships operated in Sea Areas A3 and A4 must select at least two of the methods of maintenance.

b) Methods

At-sea maintenance -- requires at least one member of the crew holding a GMDSS Maintainer License and all necessary spares parts, technical manuals, and test equipment be aboard.

Shore based maintenance -- requires ship to have shore-based maintenance available.

Duplication of equipment -- means that the following equipment, in addition to all other basic requirements, must be carried:

Sea Area A1 - a complete VHF DSC installation (including antenna). (X-F1/2 for DSC function)

Sea Area A2 - a complete VHF DSC installation and a complete MF DSC installation (including antennas). (X-F1/2 for DSC function)


Sea Area A3 - a complete VHF DSC installation and either a complete MF/HF DSC/NBDP installation (including antenna) or a complete INMARSAT ship earth station, but not a separate power source.


Sea Area A4 -- a complete VHF DSC installation and a complete MF/HF DSC/NBDP installation (including separate antenna but not a separate power source).

NOTE: The duplicated equipment must be immediately available for use - this means that while the equipment does not have to be in standby, it must be installed and ready to be operated without any assembly.

1. Method of availability of functional requirements.

Duplication of equipment

Shore-based maintenance (copy of contract verified on board)

At-sea maintenance

Requirements for Vessels operating in Sea Area A1

Ships that operate only in Sea Area A1 must meet the above requirements for all ships and the following:

a) Be capable of secondarily transmitting a distress message by using either:

A VHF installation or,

A MF installation or,

A HF installation or,

A INMARSAT installation or,

By using the Category I, 406 MHz EPIRB (this requirement may be met by either mounting
the EPIRB required for all ships near the conning position or by having remote activation capability).

b) The VHF installation required for all ships must be capable of operating on all marine VHF channels.

Requirements for Vessels operating in Sea Areas A1 and A2

Ships that operate in Sea Areas A1 and A2 must meet the above requirements for all ships, Sea Area A1 ships and the following:

a) An MF installation with DSC capability and

1) 2187.5 kHz for DSC alerting

2) 2182 kHz for radiotelephony distress and safety communications

3) capable of continuously monitoring 2187.5 kHz DSC (This may be combined with the above installation, but must provided by a separate DSC receiver).

b) A means to secondarily initiate a distress alert by either:

A category I, 406 MHz EPIRB (This requirement may be met by installing the 406 MHz EPIRB close to the conning position or by having remote activation capability); or,

A separate HF installation with DSC capability; or,

A separate INMARSAT installation.

c) A radio installation capable of transmitting and receiving general radio communications using radiotelephony or direct-printing telegraphy by either:

A MF or HF installation with the capability to operate on working frequencies in the bands 1605-4000 kHz or 4000-27500 kHz (This capability may be added to the MF installation.); or,

An INMARSAT ship earth station.

Requirements for Vessels operating in Sea Areas A1, A2 and A3

Ships that operate in Sea Areas A1, A2 and A3 must meet the requirements for all ships, Sea Area A1 and A2 ships and either paragraph a) or b):

a) Satellite:

An INMARSAT ship earth station capable of

Transmitting and receiving distress and safety communications by means of direct printing telegraphy,

Transmitting and receiving distress priority calls,

Maintaining watches for shore-to-ship distress alerts including those directed to specifically defined geographical areas,

Transmitting and receiving general radio communications using either radiotelephony or direct-printing telegraphy. 

a1) A MF radio installation including

2187.5 kHz transmit and receive using DSC

2182 kHz using radiotelephony and

Continuous monitoring capability of 2187.5 kHz DSC (may be combined with MF installation, but must have separate receiver).

a2) Means to secondarily initiate a distress alert by either:


A category I, 406 MHz EPIRB (This requirement may be met by installing the 406 MHz EPIRB close to the conning position or by having remote activation capability); or,

A separate HF installation with DSC capability; or,

A separate INMARSAT installation

b) MF/HF RT-DSC-NBDP:

A MF/HF radio installation capable of:

Transmitting and receiving on all distress frequencies in the band 1605-27500 kHz using DSC, radiotelephony, and narrow-band direct printing telegraphy.

Selecting any of the DSC distress and safety frequencies at any time,

Maintaining a DSC watch on 2187.5 kHz, 8414.5 kHz and on at least one of the DSC frequencies 4207.5 kHz, 6312 kHz, 12577 kHz, or 16804.5 Hz. (The watch-maintaining receiver may be separate from or combined with the MF/HF installation.)

b1) Means to secondarily initiate a distress alert by either:

The category I, 406 MHz EPIRB required for all ships. (This requirement may be met by installing the 406 MHz EPIRB close to the conning position or by having remote activation capability); or,

A separate INMARSAT installation.

Capability to transmit and receive general radio communications using radiotelephony and direct printing telegraphy in the bands 1605-4000 kHz and 4000-27500 kHz. (This requirement may be fulfilled by adding this capability to the MF/HF installation).

Requirements for Vessels operating in Sea Areas A1, A2, A3 and A4

Ships that operate in Sea Areas A1, A2, A3 and A4 must meet the requirements for all ships and those for
Sea Areas A1, A2 and A3 listed above except that the satellite option available in the A3 area is not available in the A4 area and the automated terrestrial option listed above (para. b) for the A3 area which is repeated here becomes mandatory:

a) An MF/HF radio installation capable of:

Transmitting and receiving on all distress frequencies in the band 1605-27500 kHz using DSC, radiotelephony, and narrow-band direct printing telegraphy,

Selecting any of the DSC distress and safety frequencies at any time,

Maintaining a DSC watch on 2187.5 kHz, 8414.5 kHz and on at least one of the DSC frequencies 4207.5 kHz, 6312 kHz, 12577 kHz, or 16804.5 Hz. (The watch-maintaining receiver may be separate from or combined with the MF/HF installation.)

A means for secondarily initiating a distress alert by both:

The category I, 406 MHz EPIRB required for all ships. (This requirement may be met by
installing the 406 MHz EPIRB close to the conning position or by having remote activation capability.) and

The MF/HF installation using DSC on any of the above DSC distress alerting frequencies. It must be possible to initiate the distress alert by this means from the position from which the ship is normally navigated.

Capability for transmitting and receiving general radio communications using radiotelephony and direct printing telegraphy in the bands 1605-4000 kHz and 4000-27500 kHz. This requirement may be fulfilled by adding this capability to the MF/HF installation.

How to check Equipment depending on Sea Area of operation

VHF transceivers (all vessels)

1. Check for operation on all marine channels.

2. Check that equipment is within frequency tolerance.

3. Check RF power output and VSWR on channels 6, 13, and 16.

4. Check correct operation of all controls including priority of control units (if provided).

5. Check that the equipment operates from the main, emergency (if provided) and reserve sources of energy.

6. Check operation of the VHF control unit(s) or portable VHF equipment provided for navigational safety from bridge wings.

7. Check for correct operation by on-air contact with a coast station or other ship.

VHF DSC controller and Channel 70 DSC watch receiver (X-F1/2 and X-R vessels)

1. Perform an off-air check confirming that correct Maritime Mobile Service Identity is programmed in the equipment.

2. Check for correct transmission by means of a routine or test call to a
coast station, other ship, on-board duplicate equipment or special test equipment.

3. Check for correct reception by means of a routine or test call from a coast station, other ship, on board duplicate equipment, or special test equipment.

4. Check the audibility of the VHF/DSC alarm.

5. Check that the equipment operates from the main, emergency (if provided) and reserve sources of energy.

6. Check that the ship's position in the distress alert is automatically provided with this information from an internal or external navigation receiver (e.g. GPS)

7. Check DSC alerting available from conning position.

8. Check that DSC distress procedure and the MMSI number are clearly displayed near the unit.

MF or MF/HF radiotelephone equipment
(Subpart W vessels as applicable and R vessels beyond 20 miles as an alternative to Inmarsat)

1. Check that the equipment operates from the main, emergency (if provided), and reserve sources of energy.

2. Check antenna tuning in all appropriate bands.

3. Check that equipment is within frequency tolerance on all appropriate bands (10 Hz).

4. Check for correct operation by measuring RF power output and VSWR and/or by contact with a coast station. [MF >60 watts or MF/HF > 120 watts]

5. Check receiver performance by monitoring known stations on all appropriate bands.

6. Check that the control unit on the bridge has first priority for the purpose of initiating distress alerts, if control units are provided outside the navigational bridge.

7. Check that the vessel is able to watch 2182kHz and transmit the 2 tone alarm signal if so equipped. (Fishing Sea Area A2 and Subpart R vessels only)

MF/HF radio telex equipment (Subpart W vessels as applicable but X-F1/2 and X-R vessels)

1. Check that the equipment operates from the main, emergency (if provided), and reserve sources of energy.

2. Confirm that the correct selective calling number is programmed in the equipment.

3. Check correct operation by inspection of recent hard copy or by a test with a coast radio station.

MF/HF DSC controller(s) (Subpart W vessels as applicable but X-F1/2 and X-R vessels)

1. Check that equipment operates from the main, emergency (if provided), and reserve sources of energy.

2. Confirm that the correct Maritime Mobile Service Identity is programmed in the equipment.

3. Check the off air self test program (if provided).

4. Check operation by means of a test call on MF and/or HF to a coast radio station if the rules of the berth permit the use of MF/HF transmissions.

5. Check the audibility of the MF/HF DSC alarm.

6. Check that the ship's position in the distress alert is automatically provided with this information from an internal or external navigation receiver (e.g. GPS).

7. Check DSC alerting is available from the conning position.

MF/HF DSC watch receiver (Subpart W vessels as applicable but X-F1/2 and X-R vessels)

1. Confirm that only DSC channels indicated in Regulations IV/9, 10, 11, and 12 are being monitored.

2. Check that a continuous watch is being maintained while keying MF/HF radio transmitters.

3. Check for correct operation by means of a test call from a coast station or other ship. 

INMARSAT Ship Earth Station(s)


(Subpart W vessels as applicable and R vessels beyond 20 miles as an alternative to Inmarsat)

1. Check that equipment operates from the main, emergency (if provided), and reserve sources of energy.

2. Where an uninterrupted supply of information from the ship's navigational or other equipment is required, ensure that such information remains available in the event of failure of the ship's main or emergency source of electrical power.

3. Check the distress function by means of an approved test procedure where possible.

4. Check for correct operation by inspection of recent hard copy of test call by telex or telephone.

5. Check distress function only if permitted to carry out test by the coast earth station.

Secondary Distress Alerting (Subpart W vessels only)

1. Identify the method of secondary means of alerting:

 

Checking of Global Navigation Satellite System Receiver (Subpart W vessels only but X-F1/2 vessels)

1. Check that information on the ship's position is continuously and automatically provided to all relevant GMDSS equipment.

2. Check that the navigation receiver is supplied from a source of energy ensuring continuous supply of the ship's position information in the event of failure of the ship's main or emergency source of energy.

 

Passenger Ship Requirements (Additional as per 80.1083 (e) (g)) (Subpart W vessels)

1. The reception notification of distress alerts by which means and the transmission of distress alerts by the required means are part of a control panel located
at the conning position of the vessel.

 

Passenger Ship Requirements (Additional as per 80.1085 (d)) (Subpart W vessels)

  1. The vessel has the proper radio equipment to communicate with aircraft on the frequencies 121.5 and 123.1 mHz.

 

Bridge to Bridge Requirements (all vessels)

1. The installation is functional and capable of operating on Channel 16, Channel 13, and Channel 22A at minimum.

 

A report of Radio Inspection provided can contain a Radio Technician's Remarks.

It is suggested that one copy of appropriate report be
left onboard and one copy be kept with the Surveyor.

GMDSS Testers All in One

BEACON Tester

BEACON Tester

BEACON TESTER enables professional checking of all types of maritime emergency radio beacons that operate in COSPAS-SARSAT system like EPIRBs, PLB. Provides mandatory annual EPIRB testing in accordance with IMO Circular MSC.1/Circ.1039, 1040.

Beacon Tester Mini Wi-Fi

Beacon Tester Mini Wi-Fi

EPIRB Tester Mini w/ W-Fi is the newest device appointed to check the maritime distress beacons (EPIRBs, PLBs) operating via COSPAS-SARSAT system. This device is really lightweight and is capable to operate via Wi-Fi with any smartphone, tablet or laptop. Its operation complies with SOLAS regulation, IMO 1039 and 1040 Circulars.

GMDSS Tester MRTS-7M

GMDSS Tester MRTS-7M

GMDSS Multi Tester MRTS-7M is designed to carry out the mandatory periodical or annual surveys of all range of GMDSS equipment: AIS Stations, EPIRBs, MF/HF/VHF Radios with DSC and NAVTEX receivers. Finally, it's all-in-one now.

SART Tester

SART Tester

The SART Tester provides precise, complete verification of the operation of any Search and Rescue Transponder in accordance with the requirements of IMO Resolution A.802(19). It is professional and user-friendly device for radio surveyors, inspectors, classification societies and administrative authorities.

GMDSS Tester MRTS-7

GMDSS Tester MRTS-7

The MF/HF/VHF/DSC/NAVTEX Marine Radio Test System MRTS-7 is intended to provide accurate, independent validation of the operation of GMDSS-radios in accordance with the requirements under IMO A.948(23) resolution.

Sarsat Beacon Monitor 406

Sarsat Beacon Monitor 406

Cospas-Sarsat Distress Signal Fixed Receiver (hereafter as Sarsat Beacon Monitor 406 – 406MHz emergency radio beacon monitoring system) is intended for 406MHz emergency radio beacon rapid signals reception, decoding and positioning. The equipment is destined to reduce rescue operation time.